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Casefile True Crime

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Now displaying: February, 2017
Feb 25, 2017

Brembate di Sopra is a small and picturesque town 7km or 4 miles north-west of the city of Bergamo in Northern Italy. About an hours drive from Milan. The province of Lombardy covers the cities of Milan and Bergamo including the small town of Brembate di Sopra. With it’s close proximity to Lake Como and the Swiss and Austrian borders, it is a popular stopover for tourists. The area is dotted with ancient villas and palazzos.

It is a humble town, not modernised to the extent of nearby Milan. Many homes still use wood burning stoves, raise chickens and grow their own vegetables. Postcards of the snow capped the Bergamo Alps sit in shop displays, and the views from the small town are a reminder that things don’t change at a fast pace in rural Italy.

The town has a traditional historical centre, classic church steeples and winding paths and gardens. It still feels like an old town with old traditions and values. Every year the small town hosts a street parade where townsfolk and others from the area come together to dress in Harlequin fancy dress and make traditional wooden floats to parade the streets. Like many old parts of the country, family values are deeply rooted, and people are fiercely loyal.

With around 8,000 residents, Brembate di Sopra is a quiet, close-knit rural community, a safe environment for a young family. A place where a 13-year-old girl walking to a nearby sports centre, alone in the late afternoon, was not given a second thought.

 

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Researched and written by Anna at A.G.P Stories

 

MUSIC

1. 'Flatline intro' and 'Come play with me' intro and outro www.dl-sounds.com

2. All other music and audio clean up performed by Mike Migas and Andrew Joslyn

 

Feb 18, 2017

Frankston is a Bayside council of Melbourne as well as a suburb itself with around 135,000 people residing there. It sits 40km or 25miles south-east from the centre of Melbourne and includes a varied mix of affluent areas as well as inexpensive and council housing. It has a mixed reputation with Frankston North renowned for drugs and crime and the south more wealthy and scenic with sweeping views of Port Phillip Bay and huge houses nestled into the hills.

 

You have heard about Frankston before on this podcast. Case 23, the Frankston serial killer. But before Paul Denyer, there was another serial killer hunting in Frankston…

 

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Researched and written by the Host.

Greatly assisted in research and co-written by Anna at A.G.P Stories.

 

– Tynong Nth Murders Channel 7 – The Channel 7 news report mentioned at the end of the podcast

Underbelly 3 – by John Silverster and Andrew Rule (One chapter is dedicated to the Frankston and Tynong case)

Suburban Nightmare, Australian True Crime Stories – by Emily Webb (One chapter is dedicated to the Frankston and Tynong case)

Frankston has one of the highest rates of crime in Victoria – Herald Sun

Six women murdered but still no conviction – The Sydney Morning Herald

Tynong North and Frankston killings remain some of Australia’s worst unsolved murders – Herald Sun

Six unsolved murders remain one of Australia’s most baffling mysteries – Courier Mail

Public revelation of serial murder suspect sparks debate – ABC

Retired detectives back in the hunt – The Age

Tynong North Murders – Big Footy

Does Frankston deserve its mixed reputation? – Homely

Feb 11, 2017

On April 28th, 1996, Martin John Bryant became known as the worst single mass-murderer in Australian History.
21 years later, the Port Arthur Massacre still stands as the 3rd deadliest shooting by a lone gunman in the world.

Known as a loner with the IQ of an 11-year-old, a series of events in Martin Bryant’s life would go on to trigger a rampage that would change hundreds of people’s lives that day, as well as the lives of everyday Australians who looked on in horror.

 

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Researched and co-written by Anna at A.G.P Stories.

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