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Casefile True Crime

Fact is scarier than fiction. Casefile, a new true crime podcast. Each episode explores a new case. We cover the shocking, the terrifying, the strange, and the unsolved.
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Now displaying: March, 2017
Mar 25, 2017

[Part 2 of 3]

(A recap of Part 1)

Ian Brady and Myra Hindley met while working together at Millwards Merchandising company. They committed the murder of 16-year-old Pauline Reade on the 12th of July 1963. Four months later the 23rd of November 1963 they murdered 12-year-old John Kilbride.

They drove both victims to Saddleworth Moor, where they killed them and buried them. Police were investigating both disappearances, and there was a large amount of media interest in both, but the two cases had not been linked. The families of Pauline and John were doing everything they could to find them. Organising their own searches and door knocks.

Brady and Hindley visited the Moor often, on what they called reconnaissance trips. They had started taking what they called souvenirs, photographs of themselves standing on the graves, which were put into albums. To everyone else, the photos blended in with other pictures of holidays and family gatherings. Only Brady and Hindley knew the secret.

Shortly After Pauline Reade's murder, Brady bought Hindley a record. The theme song to “The Legion’s Last Patrol” by Ken Thorne and his orchestra. The morning of John Kilbride’s murder Brady bought her the record, “24 hours from Tulsa” by Gene Pitney. Brady called these anniversary gifts. For the anniversary of their perfect crimes. If either of them hummed the songs, it would be a private reference to the murders.

It was now the 16th of June 1964. Seven months after the murder of John Kilbride. Brady had told Hindley he was ready to do another one. And he gave her another anniversary gift. “It’s over”, by Roy Orbison.

 

__________

Researched and written by Victoria Dieffenbacher

 

Music

– 'Flatline intro' and 'Come play with me' intro and outro 

– All other music scoring and production performed by Mike Migas and Andrew Joslyn

Mar 18, 2017

[Part 1 of 3]

The Moors in England have been a matter of interest and discussion ever since their immortalization in Emily Bronte’s “Wuthering Heights.” Where they were described as never-ending, wild, and even maddening. In Thomas Hardy’s "Tess of the d'Urbervilles", he chose the English Moors as a metaphor for fear, ignorance and savagery.

The Saddleworth Moor is an area covering 400 square miles in the Peak District of North West England. More widely known as Greater Manchester.

The Saddleworth Moor is a rich mixture of sweeping valleys, hills and plateaus falling away to fast-flowing streams. Rocky formations jut out of the blanketed, dense peat grass that covers the area. The soil is poor, and so only the hardiest of vegetation survives.

Standing at 1,312 feet above sea level, thick morning fog appears like cloud barely lifting from the ground. The eery stillness and silence are deafening.

Its immensity is both daunting as well as fascinating.

However, in the 1960’s, the Moors came to the world’s attention in a very different, frightening light. They became the scene for some of the most notorious and sadistic crimes committed in Britain. The infamous Moors murders.

 

__________

Researched and written by Victoria Dieffenbacher

 

 

 

Music

– 'Flatline intro' and 'Come play with me' intro and outro 

– All other music scoring and production performed by Mike Migas and Andrew Joslyn

 

Mar 4, 2017

On the 28th July 1986, 25-year-old Suzy Lamplugh went to work like every other day.

The office at Sturgis and Sons Real Estate was busy, and everyone was rushing about their day.

Just after 12.30pm Suzy left the office with her purse, which contained 15 pounds, her credit cards, and her car keys. She left her handbag behind. She drove her work car, a white Ford Fiesta, to an appointment on Shorrolds Road in Fulham. Her diary entry read “12:45 Mr Kipper – 37 Shorrolds Road O/S.” O/S meaning meet outside the property.

She was seen waiting outside the three storey, white Victorian Terrace just after 12.45. At 1 pm the next door neighbour at number 35, looked out his window and saw Suzy greet a good-looking, well-dressed man with swept-back dark hair, dressed in a suit and tie.

By late afternoon when Suzy hadn’t returned to the office, her work mates started to wonder where she was. It wasn’t like Suzy to take long lunch breaks or take time off. She would always let someone know where she was.

They checked her diary and saw the entry Suzy had made for the appointment with Mr Kipper. He was not known to anyone at the agency, and there was no one with that name in their records. There was no contact phone number for him either.

At 6.45pm her manager reported Suzy’s disappearance to the police.

 

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Researched and written by Anna at A.G.P Stories.

 

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MUSIC

– 'Flatline intro' and 'Come play with me' intro and outro 

– All other music scoring and production performed by Mike Migas and Andrew Joslyn

 

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